Historical monuments in Sankt Wendel County

The eventful history of Sankt Wendel County has left many interesting testimonials in its wake. Relics from our early ancestors from as early as the Neolithic period can be found, such as the 15-tonne Celtic menhir near Walhausen.
Celts, Romans and Franconian made a significant contribution to shaping the region and built refuge forts and settlements. On Mount Dollberg near Otzenhausen, the Celtic tribe of the Treverians left the largest remaining ring wall in Europe as a protective wall against the Romans.
At the intersection of two important military roads, excavations in the Wareswald have revealed the remains of an important Roman settlement and bathing area.
Various castle keeps, like those in Nohfelden and Eisweiler, still bear witness to stately possessions from the days of princes, dukes and counts.
Also interesting is the history of the idyllically situated Hofgut Imsbach Estate, which Napoleon gave to one of his officers to manage. Not far away is Johann Adams Mill, with its water wheel and thatched roof, one of the last remaining mill estates in Saarland.
Old craftsmanship is demonstrated by the historical nail smith in Sitzerath as well as the exhibition charcoal kiln in Walhausen that shows how charcoal used to be produced.

Near Tholey, an important Gallo-Roman settlement was established in the 1st. century AD at the intersection of the two important Roman roads from Metz to Mainz and from Trier to Strasbourg. The settlement at the foot of Mount Schaumberg was approximately one kilometre long. The economic crisis, which began in the 3rd century and lasted for a long time, as well as plundering campaigns by...

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The Ring Wall of Otzenhausen, popularly known as the "Hunnenring", is a Celtic stronghold fortification on the slopes of Mount Dollberg near Otzenhausen.

It was built as early as in the 1st century B.C. as a protection against the Romans and is still today considered one of the most impressive fortifications in Europe. The Ringwall is the fortified settlement of a Treverian prince. Julius...

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The over 2-metre-high demonstration charcoal kiln from the charcoal burners in Buchwald forest in Walhausen reminds us how charcoal was produced in the pre-industrial era between 1454 and 1794. Charcoal was the most important source of energy at that time and was also needed in large quantities to melt copper ores for smelting purposes.

The first documented mention of copper ore mining in...

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Nail forging has long tradition in the Hochwald. The first ironworks were built in the Hochwald as early as the middle of the 17th century. Everything needed for the production of iron was available in the area in sufficient amounts in the form of iron ore, wood and water. In the beginning, mainly ship, lock, band and slate nails were produced. Later, various types of shoe nails were made....

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The history of the settlement in Imsbach dates back to the Bronze and Iron Ages. It was first mentioned in writing in 1310. After the French Revolution, the estate passed naturally and politically into the ownership of the Oldenburg Principality of Birkenfeld in 1817. From that point onwards, Imsbach belonged to the municipal district of Selbach in the municipality of Nohfelden.

The...

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Liebenburg Castle with its tower and the remains of its wall on Schlossberg near Eisweiler is the landmark of the municipality of Namborn. "Castle Lievenberc" was built at the end of the 12th century by Bliesgaugrafen von Castel by order of the diocese of Verdun. The castle was first mentioned in documents in 1220, when the Bishop of Verdun appointed the knight "Boemund de Lievenberc" as...

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The “Hinkelstein” near Walhausen is an approx. 4,000 to 5,000-year-old menhir, which lies on the "Vor Hinkelsborn" boundary at Walhausener Bann. The 15-tonne stone dates from Neolithic times and is one of the very few testemonies of the earliest settlement in Sankt Wendel County. Two other cult stones exist in Saarland in addition to this menhir: the Gollenstein menhir near Blieskastel and...

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Discover the winding streets and historic squares of the old town.

Famous generals, artists, scholars and even the ancestress of the Windsor family have all left their mark here.

You can sense its eventful history in the picturesque old town with its historical buildings. The façades of the old town houses have been lovingly restored, particularly at the Fruchtmarkt and around the...

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The Johann Adams Mill is one of the last remaining mill estates in Saarland and is idyllically situated in a meadow valley near Theley. It was first mentioned in writing in 1589. The current mill building dates back to 1735. At that time, the region was divided into the Duchy of Lorraine and Kurtrier. Two miller families, who lived together in the mill, took turns to work in milling room...

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Wilhelm Bossel von Stein built Veldenz Castle in 1285. Today, only the castle keep is still visible, which is both a monument of significance beyond the region and the principal landmark of Nohfelden. The castle was first mentioned in writing in 1286. In 1466, the Counts of Zweibrücken inherited the castle and used it as a hunting lodge. In 1477, a few years later, Nohfelden became the...

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